Kyrkö – A Cemetery for Veteran Cars

I am not a motor person, but it has to be said that Kyrkö Car Cemetery is something special. Hidden along a forest track outside the small village of Ryd in the south of Sweden, it is not a designated scrap yard at all anymore, but closed in the 1980s. Since then, the local authorities once tried moving the cars, but they have now been left here for so long that they have become a tourist destination instead, and bring car enthusiasts from all over the World.

veteran car
Kyrkö Mosse

From bog to bug

The forested southern part of the Småland region is full of peat bogs, some huge, and some small. It was on one such that local lad Åke Danielsson had his peat collecting business when in 1940 as his back was beginning to suffer, he realised that he could also open a car scrapyard. Today all that remains of the business is a wooden shed which had a spruce tree falling over it a while ago, and then veteran cars. Lots of them. Not surprisingly, Volvos feature here, including an Amazon, and so do Volkswagen Beetles and even an old bus. Then there are cars I cannot even recognise.

VW Bubbla

Car wreck
Kyrkö in spring

 

Rusty car
Skeletons – a Volvo Amazon in the background

Nature wins over machine

The county council planned to close down the site and remove the cars in the 1990s. The area had some petrol leakage, and then there was all the metal rusting away. A date was set to clear the site, but the weather was so bad it was not possible, and no further attempt was made. Instead the site was then designated “veteran scrapyard” and started to attract tourists. The council keeps monitoring it, but it is now thought that it leaks less than first thought, and that the mosses here are not that sensitive or rare that it is a threat.

Car scrapyard Kyrkö
A Kyrkö forest road was the end for that campervan.

 

Kyrkö mosse
Cars in forest – surreal

To come to Kyrkö is to walk back in time, and it does not really matter what season you visit. In summer, the forest mosses take over the cars, in winter there are nice snow scenes to shoot for the photographer even if the light is tricky amongst the spruce trees. I have no idea how long this place will survive, so go while you can, before it is forever lost to nature.

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